Smoothing the ridges

Monday, February 18, 2013

This morning I had a rare privilege to operate a tractor in the field in February.  It was dry enough for me to use the JD 9330 tractor with the field cultivator in the field at the Waldo farm… the one that had the drainage tile installed back in early December.  After the tile is installed, rain causes the trenches to ‘settle’ and leave a rut with a hump alongside.  This operation today was to smooth the humps and fill the ruts.  It was working quite well this morning, and that was sort of a bonus, for field work in February is very rare.  Usually it is too frozen or too muddy.

I ran the tractor at a half-width for each pass, thereby giving the soil a twice-over operation, and leaving the field surface very level.  The action of the tines of the field cultivator pulls down the humps, and fills in the settled trenches.   Whoever brings the next operation over this field will be pleased, for they won’t encounter these giant ‘speed bumps’.  The next pass over this field will likely be the ammonia applicator, or the corn planter, or perhaps the sprayer.  The weather and soil conditions will tell us what comes next.

I ran the tractor and field cultivator in such a way as to overlap about half-width.  In this way, the field was worked twice.  It is rare to find soil conditions this good in February.  Working the soil twice left the surface very level.  No 'speed bumps' now!

I ran the tractor and field cultivator in such a way as to overlap about half-width. In this way, the field was worked twice. It is rare to find soil conditions this good in February. Working the soil twice left the surface very level. No ‘speed bumps’ now!  Can you see the target trenches at an angle across the tractor’s path?

Looking back, it was satisfying to smooth down those ruts and ridges.

Looking back, it was satisfying to smooth down those ruts and ridges.

I assisted John in bringing home the ammonia applicator from storage at the Huey farm.  John needs to replace some of the wiring harnesses that were damaged during the winter by chewing mice.  He has it in the shop this afternoon to begin that task.

While going to the Huey farm this afternoon, I could not help but notice the wheat crop planted there.  It captured my attention with the quality of its appearance.  The wheat there was planted after last fall’s corn harvest, and it got a great start.  This is some of the best looking wheat I’ve ever seen (for February).

This is the view of the wheat crop at the Huey farm.  It grabbed my attention as I drove by.  Lookin' good for February wheat!

This is the view of the wheat crop at the Huey farm. It grabbed my attention as I drove by.  Lookin’ good for February wheat!

Tomorrow is a big day, this farmer turns 60!  Another milestone reached.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Farm Days, News and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s