A cleaning day

Thursday, October 30, 2014

The sun came out today, but it stayed a bit cool, 59ºF.  Even with a little cooler temperature, the sunshine makes for a pleasant day!  We used part of this day to deliver soybeans to ADM in Newburgh, Indiana.  The bean market has had a little rally, and we’re responding by selling some from storage.  We must keep some soybeans here for a January 2015 delivery contract.

The other task today is to continue cleaning the equipment. First for me today was the ‘dry cleaning’ of the S680 combine.

Here are the main tools for the 'dry cleaning' of the combine.  I use the leaf blower to clear away the loose leaves and dust.  The little pry bar scrapes loose the crusty patches, and then the blower carries it all away.

Here are the main tools for the ‘dry cleaning’ of the combine. I use the leaf blower to clear away the loose leaves and dust. The little screwdriver-like pry bar scrapes loose the crusty patches, and then the blower carries it all away.

Wearing a dust mask is preferred while performing this first pass at cleaning a combine.  While you’re blowing, the dust fogs around you… it’s better if it’s a little windy to carry the dust away faster.  You really want a shower when you get done!

Here you see some of the dust and crop debris that have been scraped and blown off the S680.  Most of this stuff was on, in and under the feeder house.   The sides and back of the combine also has some places where dust and leaves can accumulate, especially under the top cover of the PowerCast tailboard (spreader).

Here you see some of the dust and crop debris that have been scraped and blown off the S680. Most of this stuff was on, in and under the feeder house. The sides and back of the combine also have some places where dust and leaves can accumulate, especially under the top cover of the PowerCast tailboard (spreader).

This post-harvest ‘dry cleaning’ is made easier if you perform a leaf blower cleaning at the end of each work day.

The next step for the combine cleaning is the washing stage.  For that, the combine is placed on our wash pad, where it is soaked with water, scrubbed with a soapy brush, and rinsed clean.   Next summer, the green (or red) outer body panels will receive a coat of wax.

The CIH 4412F corn head is on the wash pad waiting a 'dry cleaning' and a wash.

The CIH 4412F corn head is on the wash pad waiting a ‘dry cleaning’ and a wash.

For the “blowing” step on the corn head, we use compressed shop air (on a long wand) to blow away the loose dust and debris…rather than the leaf blower used on the combine.

Here you see the Demco 1350 grain cart... all clean and parked in the back of the big storage barn.  It will remain there until the next harvest season!

Here you see the Demco 1350 grain cart… all clean and parked in the back of the big storage barn. It will remain there until the next harvest season!

The weather will determine how fast this clean-up goes.  If it turns off cold or rainy, that will delay the clean-up progress.  But today is a good day for cleaning, and some progress has been made.

Mr. Worland has returned to the WASCoB-building project on the Roberson farm.  He was stopped for a couple days after Tuesday’s rain.

Ross is monitoring the grain market, and John is prepared to do some fall spraying as soon as conditions permit.  He has the JD 4730 sprayer all ready to go.

 

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